Value of Citizen Science to Environmental Knowledge

More grist for the mill in terms of the value of citizen science to environmental knowledge. However, it is not simply a case of citizen scientists contributing ‘raw data’, but also framing the questions to be asked. Identifying the risks, challenges and changes, collaborating with paid scientists to identify potential responses too. Great post!

Woodland Matters

For the past 14 years, enthusiastic volunteers have been helping track changes in seasonal natural events through Nature’s Calendar, adding thousands of records to the UK Phenology Network database. Faithfully, they have observed and recorded when trees come into leaf or flower in spring, when migrant birds arrive and leave, and have spent their autumn days noting when leaves change colour, then fall, or when fruit ripens. The data is being used by students and scientists across the UK, and even further afield, to research the implications of climate change for our natural world.

These recorders are part of a tradition that goes back much further, starting with Robert Marsham, who began recording his ‘Indications of Spring’ back in 1736 on his family estate near Norwich, Norfolk, and continued to record for 62 years. From 1875 until 1947 the Royal Meteorological Society co-ordinated a nation-wide network of recorders…

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